Current Issue
Organiser Home
Editorial
EXPOSE
Reports
Comment
The Moving Finger Writes
Media Watch
Thinking Aloud
Bookmark
A PAGE FROM HISTORY
RETROSPECT
Kids Org.
News Round-up
Readers’ Forum:
INTERESTING PEOPLE
PERSPECTIVE
Kerala Newsletter

Previous Issues
September 04, 2011

August 28, 2011
August 21, 2011
August 14, 2011
August 07, 2011

July 31, 2011
July 24, 2011
July 17, 2011
July 10, 2011
July 03, 2011

June 26, 2011
June 19, 2011
June 12, 2011
June 05, 2011

May 29, 2011
May 22, 2011
May 15, 2011
May 08, 2011
May 01, 2011

April 24, 2011
April 17, 2011
April 10, 2011
April 03, 2011

March 27, 2011
March 20, 2011
March 13, 2011
March 06, 2011

February 27, 2011
February 20, 2011
February 13, 2011
February 06, 2011

January 30, 2011
January 23, 2011
January 16, 2011
January 09, 2011
January 02, 2011

December 26, 2010
December 19, 2010
December 12, 2010
December 05, 2010
November 28, 2010
November 21, 2010
November 14, 2010
November 7, 2010

October 31, 2010
October 24, 2010
October 17, 2010
October 10, 2010
October 03, 2010

2010 Issues
2009 Issues
2008 Issues
2007 Issues
2006 Issues

Organiser
About us
Advertisement
Circulation
Contact us

Subscribe


March 27, 2011




Page: 12/36

Home > 2011 Issues > March 27, 2011

Many moods of Nehru in Kashmir
By Jayant Patel

Nehru’s Kashmir, Sai Sahni, Wisdom Tree, Pp 111(HB), price not given

THIS is a beautiful coffee-table book which should have been called ‘Nehru in Kashmir’ or the ‘Many Moods of Nehru’ as it focuses more on Nehru and less on Kashmir. This could probably be because his personality was so towering or because he was an icon that he tended to overshadow the background or because the camera of Sati Sahni was focused more on the outdoor activities of Nehru than on Kashmir’s landscape. However, Nehru, being the first Prime Minister of India and a world statesman, and one who seldom sat sill in one place, it must have been quite a task for Sati Sahni to photograph him.

The author-photographer was a journalist and war correspondent when Pakistan invaded Jammu & Kashmir in 1947-48.

In the foreword to the book, Karan Singh, the erstwhile Sadr-i-Riyasat and son of Maharaja Hari Singh of Jammu & Kashmir talks of the many occasions he received Nehru at the airport and accompanied him when he went to meet the people of the state. He recalls how bands of students and citizens would line up on both sides of the road and the River Jhelum shouting, "Jawaharlal Nehru zindabad" and "Hindustan zindabad", which is in a cruel contrast "to the situation today."

The collection of photographs is simply breathtaking, particularly some which are rather exclusive and not seen elsewhere. There is a photograph of Nehru in swimming trunks doing surf-boarding, while the board is being pulled by a motorboat driven in big circles in the Dal Lake.

The photographs are so captivating that one wonders if coloured photographs could have revealed the beauty of the state more appealingly as what the black-and-white have very efficiently achieved. On going through the pictures, one is reminded of what Nehru had written about this beautiful Jammu & Kashmir valley which is "like some wonderland of our dreams, encircled by high mountains that guard it zealously from intrusion."

(Wisdom Tree, 4779/23 Ansari Road, Daryaganj, New Delhi-110 002; www.wisdomtreeindia.com)




Previous Page Previous Page (11/36) - Next Page (13/36) Next Page


copyright© 2004 Bharat Prakashan(Delhi) Ltd. All Rights Reserved
Designed and Hosted by KSHEERAJA Web Solutions Pvt Ltd