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March 27, 2011




Page: 13/36

Home > 2011 Issues > March 27, 2011

A Gandhi travelogue
By Manju Gupta

Catching up with Gandhi, Graham Turner, Penguin Books India Pvt Ltd, Pp 329(PB), Rs 350.00

THIS is a sort of a travelogue in which the author, Graham Turner, in the company of Mahatma Gandhi’s grandson Rajmohan Gandhi, visits the places which mean the most to the latter. No matter how much one has heard or read about the Mahatma Gandhi and his role in shaping Indian history, even if one is to retrace Gandhi’s footsteps, it cannot be like being there, standing where he stood, walking where he walked, seeing what he saw, talking to some of the people he knew.

Turner chooses to travel to South Africa where Gandhi spent 21 of his most formative years and visits places where Gandhi went. Turner undertook this journey through Africa in the company of Ela, daughter of Gandhi’s second son, Manilal.

It may sound strange that what prompted Turner to undertake the journey? In his own words, he wanted to find out "what made him (Mahatma Gandhi) the man he was. What is the reason for his continuing magic, this little man in a dhoti who had neither wealth, nor property or official title but has left the legacy of a life which, with its unwavering adherence to non-violence, is a one-man rebuke to the murderous twenty-first century."

Here the author talks of his visit in the company of Rajmohan Gandhi to Porbandar, where he enters the 11-room house which had been bought by Mahatma Gandhi’s great grandfather in 1777 and where Mahatma Gandhi was born.

(Penguin Books India Pvt Ltd, 11 Community Centre, Panchsheel Park, New Delhi - 110 017)




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