Values and Direction

    30-Apr-2021   
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There is an important saying in Sanskrit Vidya Tu Abhyasen (knowledge stays functional only through its continuous practice). Later, in the English language, a similar sounding saying, ‘practice makes a man perfect,’ came into being. But, unlike in the case of Sanskrit, the focus in English saying is on man and not on consciousness (as it is in Sanskrit). This difference of focus encompasses subtle yet huge difference in vision/gaze 

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Indic spiritual values, mirrored most transparently in human consciousness as an order of priorities (values), are eternally crystal clear here. Values drive direction and, moving in the right direction alone is an indication of upholding values. So what comes first, upholding values or choosing direction?
 
These are the points that merit open contemplation by free-thinking individuals. How does the Indic set of values differ from the ‘same values’ in other cultures and civilisations? What causes transcendence, why it is caused, by whom and to whom and how it is attributed? Where and when a human value transforms into divine value? Answers to all such answers are very simply realised in the Indic wisdom tradition known as the eternal guru-disciple relationship, which is the receptacle of liberation and liberated beings. Imagine for a moment the scenario in the absence of the said receptacle/relationship/tradition (Parampara), when no living human being among us is liberated? Then, how can liberation as a value be upheld? Upholding a value means living that value through one’s life. In the absence of Jivan-Mukta (liberated beings), liberation will reduce to a belief. While liberation is true and real, it’s not a belief. So is the existence of liberated ones, namely true and real. Why should reality be reduced to a belief? It will be akin to smothering intelligence instead of letting it blossom fully.
 
Though the consciousness of divinity is evenly spread in all that ‘appears to be’ yet, when one is incapable of seeing it in its most visible point (that is human than self), how would one see obscure divine places? It puts a curtain on its own eternal possibility, potential and probability to attain the highest.
 
We all know that the potential and the possibility to attain the highest spiritual reach lies in the human frame compared to any other form of life known to human beings.
 
Does aforesaid ‘assertion’ need any proof or evidence? Don’t we all know this by being evidence that human beings are most evolved in terms of consciousness? Even the ones who have yet to realise themselves as evidence also know that the human being is the most conscious being among the species or existences known to humanity.
 
Eternal guru shishya parampara stays one step ahead and acknowledges, asserts and reiterates through ever unbroken chain of realised ones that we (human beings) are most evolved in terms of consciousness are consciousness itself.
 
Swayambhu (self-existent) living guru parampara maintains that ultimate consciousness itself assumes the form of a human being to renew and revitalise self-remembrance. And it is accomplished by purifying the intelligence to such an extent that it becomes capable of seeing one’s own eternal existence (aatmaanaam srijaamyaham). That’s how life or the world is termed as Leela (play) of self-existence
 
 
Swayambhu (self-existent) living guru parampara maintains that ultimate consciousness itself assumes the form of a human being to renew and revitalise self-remembrance. And it is accomplished by purifying the intelligence to such an extent that it becomes capable of seeing one’s own eternal existence (aatmaanaam srijaamyham). That’s how life or the world is termed as Leela (play) of self-existent.
 
There is a saying in Sanskrit Vidya Tu Abhyasen (knowledge stays functional only through its continuous practice). Later, in the English language, a similar sounding saying, ‘practice makes a man perfect,’ came into being. But, unlike in the case of Sanskrit, the focus in English saying is on man and not on consciousness (as it is in Sanskrit). This difference of focus encompasses subtle yet huge difference in vision/gaze.
 
It’s a similar type of difference that exists between history and itihaas, namely the difference of vision.
 
Have you observed what you do while you play any sports? Essentially you keep exercising your body and mind repeatedly, irrespective of the form or design of the game. The essence of every game/sport is to keep mind and body active and fit; all other attributes are secondary.
 
Those among you who play some sport may know this much better than regular practice keeps muscle memory on tenterhooks, the mind stays agile. Isn’t it a revitalisation of body and mind? Isn’t sports a most repetitive practice? Don’t you feel out of place if you become irregular or less enthusiastic about your practice?
 
Suppose supreme consciousness becomes irregular in appearing as human beings? Wouldn’t it go beyond the reach of human beings? Human beings need to attain eternal consciousness to embrace liberation and eternal consciousness to keep revitalising themselves by keeping appearing in the human frame. The arrangement is end-to-end mutual (paraspar-bhaavyantah).
 
In spirituality/reality, life is infused in one’s own existence (aatmaa) by seeing the divine in others. But, how to see the divine in others without upholding divinity as a value?
 
(The writer is the propounder of Sahaj Smriti Yog System of Self Realisation and founder of Darpan Foundation and Darpan Ashram)